Interactive Survey Game!

A survey questionnaire come to life! Use (nearly) any object to gather helpful data through an interactive, engaging, and fun multiple-choice survey.

This project uses the Makey Makey microcontroller in combination with a Raspberry Pi computer to read in participants’ survey choices and save the results in a text file.

Planning & Design!

This general design is easily customized to fit a different theme. The only crucial design requirement is to use materials that conduct electricity for the survey pieces, or wrap non-conductive materials in aluminum foil.

Suggestions:
Prototype, prototype, prototype! Build different versions and test them on family, friends, co-workers, or (ideally) your target audience. Observe how folks interact with your survey, then use that to make it better! And always remember to keep it simple 🙂

Materials

Makey Makey Kit
– Computer: Raspberry Pi

– One (1) ground piece, five (5) survey response pieces, one (1) submit piece, and two (2) yes/no pieces*

22 Gauge (stranded) Wire — five (5) 10 – 16″ strips and three (3) 6″ pieces (ends stripped)

– Container:

— Wood Box (12.5″ x 12.5″)
— Plexliglass.(“12 x 12”)
— Three (3) 2″ x 2″ wood panels

* Specific materials used in this design are detailed with the corresponding procedure, although customization is encouraged!

Tools

Safety goggles, woo!
Multimeter
— Optional: Soldering iron, solder& desoldering wick
— Ruler (or calipers)
Drill w/ both drill and driver bits
Flat wood file (to prevent splinters!)
Hot glue gun
— Epoxy (permanent)
– Pliers

Reprogram the Makey Makey

To reprogram the Makey Makey, you’ll need to have the Arduino IDE with Makey Makey drivers installed. Here’s a thorough tutorial on how to do this.


1. Plug Makey Makey into computer and open the Arduino IDE.

2. Open (or copy) Makey Makey source code:
Here’s the GitHub page for the Makey Makey.
Here’s a direct link to download the full program. This is a .zip file, so be sure to extract all the files.

3. Reprogram the “click” key into an “enter” key.
For a thorough overview of how to do this, check out this tutorial.

4. Change the following keys:
These two keys are mapped in the survey program, but can be left as-is or you can choose to switch other keys (e.g. the arrow keys). Just be sure to change the mapping in the program.

A. Change the “g” into an “n”.
B. Change “space” key into “y”.

Build the Survey Response Pieces!

Specific materials used in this design:

– Two (2) wood blocks, two (2) golf balls, and one (1) jar lid.
– Aluminum foil
Unistrut 1/2″ Channel Nut with Spring
– Ten (10) 1/2″ washers
– Plexiglass [or wood] (12″ x 12″)

Procedure:

1. Wrap each of the survey response pieces at least 2 – 3 times with foil, hot gluing each layer.

2. For unistrut spring pieces, hot glue (or epoxy) the top of the spring to the bottom of each survey response piece — be sure that the metal of the spring is touching the foil of the survey piece.

3. Attach the survey pieces to plexiglass.

Determine location of survey response pieces and mark with tape. Drill a hole at each point.

Place a washer on either side of the hold and screw bolt into unistrut spring about 3 turns.

4. Connect a wire to each of the unistrut spring pieces.

Wrap wire around base of bolt (between washer and plexiglass). Hand tighten the bolt to secure wire without squishing it

Build the Ground Piece!

Specific materials used in this design:
– Styrofoam ball
– Metal pipe
– Flange stand for pipe
– Aluminum foil
– Twelve (12) washers
– 4 wood screws
– Wood panel (2″ x 2″)

Procedure

1. Build a stand for the styrofoam ball — use conductive materials or wrap pieces in foil.

2. Wrap styrofoam ball in aluminum foil, leaving a “tail” of foil. Place ball on stand and push the foil tail against the inside of  Hot glue pieces together.

3. Cover the exposed end of the ground wire (24″) to the inside, or bottom, of base and adhere with tape or epoxy.

5. Add a layer of two (2) washers under base to avoid squishing the wire, then connect base to wood pane via screws or epoxy.

Build the Enter Key!

Specific materials used in this design:

– Clothespin
– Wood panel (2″ x 2″)
– One (1) wood screw + one (1) washer

The screw should be about 1/4″ longer than the wood thickness.

– Aluminum foil

Procedure:

1. Wrap one of the handles of the clothespin in foil.

2. Remove clothespin spring clamp, align other side of the clothespin on wood panel, and drill in a screw and washer.

Foil on the other side of the clothespin should make contact with the washer + screw when closed.

3. Reconnect spring clamp and other side (may need pliers). Epoxy bottom of clothespin to wood panel.

4. Use alligator clip or wrap wire around screw and secure with hot glue.

Make the Yes and No Keys! 

Specific materials used in this design:
– Two (2) plastic container lids
– Two (2) wood panels (2″ x 2″)
– Two (2) wood screws and washers

Each screw should be about 1/4″ longer than the wood thickness.

– Aluminum foil


Procedure

1. Cut circle out of container lids. Wrap in foil.

2. Align lids on wood panels and drill in a wood screw with washer on top — be sure the screw slightly pokes through the back of the wood panel.

3. Use alligator clip or wrap wire around screw and secure with hot glue. 

Connect Pieces to Makey Makey

1. Connect ground piece lead to Makey Makey ground pads.

2. Connect survey game pieces to the first five (5) Makey Makey back header pins on the left: “w”, “a”, “s”, “f”, and “d”.

3. Connect the no button to the last (6th) back header pin, “g”

4. Connect the yes button to the “space” pads.

5. Connect the submit piece to the “click” pads.



Load the Survey Program!

Using a Raspberry Pi computer means that all of the electronics can fit into the game box! Write up a program in Python to cycle through a series of survey questions and five possible choices that map to the survey response pieces.

Here’s my code:
GitHub page!
Python program only.

Final Touches & Case!

This case is designed to withstand high traffic, experimentation, and children — and to be easily (and cheaply) fixable and adjustable. Use this design or customize your own!

Materials:
12.5″ x 12.5″ wood box
1″ x 10 ” wood panel

Procedure:
1. Epoxy wood panel onto front of box.

2. Drill the submit, yes, and no keys into the wood panel.


Recommended to put the “submit” button on the far right (switched this after further testing and feedback).

 

3. Drill hole large enough to fit an HDMI port in the back panel of the box.

I used two 3/8″ bits and filed down the hole until the HDMI port fit.

4. Label the survey game pieces and the submit, yes, and no keys.

Test, & Install!

Connect the Raspberry Pi to a monitor, keyboard, and the Makey Makey. Test the program and double check all the keys. Once everything is up and running, remove the keyboard (and mouse if connected).

Load the python program, stand back, and let passersby have a blast participating in a survey!

Blinking Light(s) with the Raspberry Pi!

Welcome to the wonderful world of controlling physical objects with software! This tutorial is a complete beginners introduction to the Raspberry Pi computer, covering the basic features and functions to help you bring your ideas to life!

IMG_4140

Blinking a light using the Raspberry Pi’s General Purpose Input and Output (“GPIO”) pins is the hardware equivalent of a “Hello World” software program.

  1. First, gather the following materials:
    Breadboard (or wires/alligator clips)
    Two (2) Breadboard wires (Male-to-female are ideal)
    One (1) (or more!) LED (Light Emitting Diode)
    One (1) 330 Ohm resistor
    And the rest of the normal stuff to set up the RPi (SD card, power cord, keyboard + mouse (or just keyboard), HDMI cable and monitor.)
  2. Wire up the breadboard!IMG_4146
    Pick a GPIO pin. Attach the female end of one breadboard wire to the GPIO pin, and the male end
    Connect the other breadboard wire from ground on the RPi (third down on exterior side) to negative slot on the breadboard.
    Connect the resistor from the positive series of holes to an open row on the breadboard (I picked row 10).Connect the long side of the LED to the same row the resistor is in. Connect the short side to the negative slot.
    Make sure nothing explodes (just kidding that probably won’t happen 🙂 )
  3. Write a quick Python program.
    The program switches the GPIO pin between on and off, turning the LED on/off as it switches. Save the program somewhere easy, like the Desktop.
    Here’s my code if you need some assistance:

    import RPi.GPIO as gpio
    import time

    #SEtup pin 18 as an output
    gpio.setmode(gpio.BCM)
    gpio.setup(18, gpio.OUT),/span>

    #define data to be the value of pin 18
    #data = GPIO.IN0(18)

    #Make an LED flash on and off
    while True:
    gpio.output(18, gpio.HIGH)
    print(‘Light is on.’) #Optional printout of status
    time.sleep(1) #changing the number increases/decreases length of signal
    #print(data)
    gpio.output(18, gpio.LOW)
    print(‘Light is off.’) #Optional printout of status
    time.sleep(1)
    #print(data)

  4. Run the program!

IMG_4144In the terminal window, go to the folder where you saved your program. The command cd + the directory name (ex. /home/pi/Desktop) will take you there.
Run the program by typing sudo python “ProgramTitle”.py
As long as everything is connected and the program does what you think it does, the LED will flash.
That’s it! Super simple, and it means that this little RPi computer just controlled a physical object wooooo!!!
Optional fun:
– Change the timing of the blink.
– Connect a couple more LEDs the same way you connected the first (these will be in parallel with each other).
– Connect additional GPIO pins to more LEDs and change the timing (remember to also add in the appropriate code).

Helpful info:

www.atariarchives.org
www.atariarchives.org


As shown in the photo to the right, breadboards usually have columns for positive and negative (red and black, respectively) that are connected electrically all the way down the board.  Each row contains 5 holes that are also connected.

The resistor needs to go in between the LED and the power source to limit the amount of current, or electricity, flowing through the LED. The LED would be brighter w/out the resistor, but it will probably burn up super quick.

Happy building!

IMG_4150

Setting up a Raspberry Pi to Control Physical Objects, Pt. 2

What cool things can you do with the Raspberry Pi?

Source: http://www.aoakley.com
Source: http://www.aoakley.com

Welcome back to exploring the Raspberry Pi! There are tons of awesome things you can do with the Raspberry Pi — (pretty much) everything that you would do on a normal computer, like word processing, surfing the internet, streaming videos, etc.

You can write programs on it using the Idle software (Python language), Scratch, or Linux. This might seem mundane, but keep in mind that you bought this lil’ computer for only $30 dollars (+shipping and handling). If you have kids, this is a fantastic option for a first computer! The RPi naturally teaches and encourages hardware and software programming. Plus, you won’t mind as much when the kids spill apple juice all over it (or if you’re like me and still spill apple juice on computers, this is a great option for a backup computer..).

 

You can print this GPIO Leaf and stick in on the board!
You can print this GPIO Leaf and stick in on the board!

GPIO Pins!
By far the coolest way to use the Pi is to interface w/ the real world using the GPIO pins (that row of 26 pins adjacent to the RCA video port, or the yellow port). The GPIO pins have different functions as shown in the photo below: 17 of the 26 total pins are actual GPIO pins, while the rest are either ground, a power source (5 VDC or 3.3 VDC) or labeled “DNC” for “Do Not Connect”/”N/C” for “Not Connected” (connecting to these pins may short the Pi, so it is recommended to avoid these).

GPIO pins can be used as an input or an output. As an input, the pin can distinguish between two values: HIGH*  and LOW. As an output, you can send an ON, or HIGH signal (3.3 VDC), or an OFF, or LOW signal (0 VDC). These pins can be used for tons of physical tasks, like turning on/off lights (Christmas light choreography, anyone??), controlling motors, reading sensors, and honestly pretty much anything you can conceive, as long as you build a proper circuit.

Some of the GPIO pins also have more specific functions, such as SDA (data line), SCL (clock), etc.; if you’re reading this as a beginner don’t worry about these just yet. When you find a project you’re excited about you’ll naturally learn these functions as necessary.
*High input threshold is a signal of ~ 1.8 VDC, although it can vary between 0.8 – 2.0 VDC. This means that any signal coming in to your GPIO pin that is above 0.8 VDC may be read as “HIGH” by the RPi.

Advanced users will be happy to know that you can modify many of the GPIO characteristics from software (this link also has the robust GPIO electrical specifications).

For absolute beginners, here are some helpful things to know about the GPIO pins:
ac-dc-voltageGPIO pins operate on Direct Current (DC) voltage. Unless you want to see smoke come out of the RPi, do NOT input Alternating Current (AC) signals, like the one that comes out of the wall.
Be very careful about what you connect to the GPIO pins. You will not be able to control a motor directly from a GPIO pin; in this instance, the GPIO pin functions as a switch, rather than the actual power for the motor. Here’s a great tutorial on how to control a small motor.

Looking for more inspiration? Here’s a general list of 25 cool things to do w/ your RPi! You can also Google “Raspberry Pi projects” or browse the Instructables website for RPi projects.

The next post will cover a simple circuit you can build and control w/ the RPi.

Setting up a Raspberry Pi to Control Physical Objects, Pt. 1

RaspberryPiLogosmallThere are a slew of relatively simple systems to control physical objects w/ software. The most popular options are Arduino, the Raspberry Pi, and BeagleBoard. I’m an avid Raspberry Pi advocate, so let’s start with that!

The RPi is a simple & inexpensive computer that has general purpose input and output (GPIO) pins that interface w/ the real world.

(This tutorial assumes you are a beginner, but some technical jargon is included. Please feel free to comment if a term or phrase is not clear.)

What is a Raspberry Pi?RaspiModelB-1024x902

The Raspberry Pi is a credit-cared sized computer created by the Raspberry Pi Foundation, an educational charity based in the UK. It is designed to promote programming, computing, and interfacing with the physical world. It can control pretty much anything you are capable of conceiving.

There are two versions of the Pi:

  • Model A is cheaper w/ fewer features; 256 MB of RAM, one USB port and no Ethernet port.
  • Model B is more expensive, but has 512 MB of RAM, two USB ports, and a 100mb Ethernet port.

Where to purchase:

You can buy a Raspberry Pi from a variety of distributors. Model B from Adafruit is $40 (+ shipping & handling).

Other supplies:

RaspPiStarterKitThe Pi is literally just a computer. You’ll need a few additional supplies to set it up and use it (unless you’re a wizard). Think of it like a puzzle: collect the remaining pieces to customize an inexpensive interactive computer! To make the process easier, here’s a list of parts w/ explanations (you probably already have some):

  1. Power Cord
    The Pi runs on a micro-USB power supply, similar to many phone chargers. More specifically, the Pi needs 5 VDC and at least 700 mA. The Pi Foundation recommends a power supply that can provide 1200 mA. You can get one for less than $10, best values ~ $5, if you’re crafty you can find cheaper (or free). Here’s a google search for some that meet the best specs. Take note of where the power cord plugs into: wall socket, USB, etc.
  2. SD Card
    The Pi needs an SD card for physical memory storage (it doesn’t have a built-in hard drive or solid state drive). For ~ $6, you can buy an SD card with a pre-installed operating system and necessary software from the Pi Foundation’s Swag store here.
    With slightly more effort, you can buy any generic SD card and download the software here. This is fairly easy with a Mac system; if you chose to go down this route, here’s a great tutorial.
  3. Monitor & Display cable: HDMI/DVI cable or RCA composite video lead.
    Most modern monitors and TVs have HDMI ports for video (you can connect your RPi to your TV, woo!!). If you don’t already have one lying around, HDMI cables are found at RadioShack, Best Buy, Amazon, Ebay, etc. You can also get a HDMI converter cable for monitors or TVs w/ different ports. Older monitors are easy to find for free; many places of business, colleges/universities, and friends are happy to part with old monitors, or you can check out e-waste recycling bins.
  4. USB Keyboard & mouse (easiest way to set up).
    Any keyboard and mouse w/ a USB connection will work w/ the Pi.

Optional Supplies:

  1. Raspberry-Pi-Geek-Cases-1Ethernet Cable  (easiest way to connect to the Internet for Model B).

    Usually blue and lying around in some pile of cords you know are important. You can also buy them at places like Radio Shack, Best Buy, Amazon, etc.
  2. USB WiFi chip.
    Getting a USB WiFi “dongle” (yes, that is actually what it is called..) will allow you to connect to the Internet w/out an Ethernet cable. This requires some fairly involved setup, but it is completely doable for a RPi user of any experience level. Here are two methods:
    –Using wicd-curses,
    –Using GUI application
  3. Audio Lead (if not using HDMI)
    To get sound w/out an HDMI cable, you’ll need a standard 3.5mm jack to connect to speakers or headphones.
  4. Case
    The Raspberry Pi is designed to be a bare-bones computer to reduce cost as much as possible. However, cases are helpful protection from inevitable accidents and improve the mechanical connection of cables. There are TONS of awesome cases made specifically for the Raspberry Pi, although feel free to get creative and make your own!

Basic Setup:

raspberry_pi_iphone

  1. Insert SD card. Plug the RPi into a monitor & connect the keyboard and mouse via USB. An Ethernet cord is also recommended as it makes installing software on the RPi much easier.
  2. Plug the power cord into the RPi. Make sure you see a light turn on. (Yes, I honestly needed to include this step because this is an all too frequent problem for me.)
    Always do this after everything else is plugged in.
  3. If everything has been connected properly, you will see a start-up window. Every operating system (OS) will be different, but initial setup is simple and manageable.
    If you have a pre-loaded RPi-specific OS, or you have Raspbian or Adafruit’s OS, here’s a super straightforward tutorial on how to fully configure the RPi.Changing a few basic settings will definitely make life easier. From personal experience, if you have an SD card larger than 2 MB it’s useful to initially expand root partition to use the full SD capacity. If you want to avoid a command line window, you can specify Desktop launch whenever you power up the RPi.The default username is “pi” and the password is “raspberry”.Note: Since every OS is different, if your Pi doesn’t launch into the startup window, if you are still on the terminal window type “startx” into the command line. If that doesn’t work, leave a comment and we can troubleshoot together!
  4. Essentially that’s it! Once you’re at the desktop, you can use the Pi much like any other computer! Some basic programs: Midori is a simple Internet browser, Leafpad is a word processing program, Idle is a Python programming environment, and Scratch is kid-friendly programming language.

I will add more on how to set up the wireless, or other topics as requested.